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Press Releases For May: Here Are The Artists

press releases for May
Maryze among these press releases for May

Lost Cat, Near Beer, Maryze, All Get Out, Liz Lamere, John Errol, and Sarah Kinsley are among these press releases for May.

Lost Cat – “L.O.S.T.”: Frenetic guitar riffs, wailing vocals, and a garage rock track in its purest form; the song will shake you and trip you up for 2:20 minutes of raucous joy reviving ‘60s TV, as the music video accompanying the song seems to let us think. “L.O.S.T.” is the single off the band’s self-titled debut album, “Lost Cat,” just released on May 27 via Lolipop Records. Mixing classic riot grrrl and the flair of a 60s girl group a la The Dick Clark show, Lost Cat exists at the crossroads between old and new. On the track’s accompanying music video, they declared: “Brought to you by the minds of Expo Aktuel & Lolipop Records. In this first mystery-driven episode of Lost Cat’s upcoming video mini-series, the group gets caught between the claws of an evil villainess who aims to take down the rockin’ band of Femme Fatales. However, Lost Cat is not going down without a fight! ‘L.O.S.T.’ is the first of three action-packed videos/episodes which feature their upcoming singles out this month on Lolipop Records! Tune in this month to find out the fate of Los Angeles’ favorite new girl group Lost Cat!” This month, Lost Cat had a residency at Harvard & Stone, but they will also make a few appearances abroad in Spain, France, the Netherlands, and Belgium during the month of June.

Near Beer (Henry Clay People) – “Yelling at a Dog”: Ferocious guitars, pounding drums, yelled vocals that build a powerful punk rock anthem coming with a large-sized chorus while reflecting the anxiety of our times; it comes with a dog video. Los Angeles-based indie rock band Near Beer — Joey Siara (vocals, guitar), Brent Stranathan (drums), Jeremy Levy (bass, backup vocals) — have shared this new single off their self-titled album, due summer 2022 via Double Helix Records. Speaking about their new single, the band wrote: “‘Yelling at a Dog’ was the first song we wrote that felt like a distinctly NEAR BEER tune. It sounds a lot LESS like all of our previous bands—it’s got more 12-string, minor chords, and ‘sure, why not?’ kinds of turns. Lyrically, it’s very much a blender of thirties-band-person anxieties—being broke, being terrified of the future, questioning your life decisions, but still kinda okay with it all. We suppose this is just a variation on the same rock & roll romantic themes we sang about in our twenties, but maybe with higher stakes because the fuck-ups can feel more permanent. Also, we all love dogs. If we actually saw people yelling at dogs, we’d be pretty bummed. So consider this an anti-yelling-at-dogs song.” On the song’s accompanying video, the band added: “This is a tribute to our noble companions and the simple, sometimes grotesque pleasures of consuming life-sustaining yums in slow-motion. It features our dogs and several of our friends’ dogs and was assembled by our good buddy Matt Wyatt. We are big on rescue dogs. They’re the best. And there’s something about seeing the strange joy on my elderly dog’s face as she negotiates a dental bone. I’m sure there’s some kind of life metaphor in there somewhere, right?”

Maryze – “Emo”: A languid tune starting with an acoustic guitar and Maryze’s lovely R&B-influenced vocals, but soon cranking up the volume with a gritty rock chorus and touches of ‘90s grunge. This is a song from “8,” the anticipated debut album of Maryze, a Montreal’s bilingual queer pop icon. “8,” released on Hot Tramp Records, explores the interconnected parts of our past that shape our lives for the better or worse. Like the infinite looping of the number 8, the album observes how we repeat cycles and exist within pre-written narratives. Can we cut loose from toxic histories knotted tightly within us while still honoring our ancestors? How do our coping mechanisms protect us and how do they hold us back, rooting us to events we wish to grow away from? Maryze weaves together songs with themes of intergenerational family trauma, mental illness, identity, sexuality, ruptures, forgiveness, and acceptance, performed in both English and French. Teaming up with other queer artists like Margo and Backxwash, and debuting her first self-produced tracks, she experiments with genres that have influenced her life, from emo and hyperpop to Celtic folk. Offering both maximalist electronic production and stripped-down ballads, “8” introduces Maryze’s modern electronic alt-pop, calling listeners to consider the roots and knots that exist within each of us. For “8,” Maryze worked with producers Solomon K-I, Margo, Tigerwing, Jeshway, and Korovo. Her longtime collaborator and partner Solomon K-I mixed and mastered the album, adding additional production touches to each track. Their breakup f*ck you anthem “Emo” pays homage to how they met while playing in a rock band, and features live drums from punk musician Graeme MacDonald, their former drummer.

All Get Out -“AA Almanac”: A blistering sound with gritty guitars and raucous vocals, exploring the album’s themes of small-town life. The tune has touches of Midnight Oil’s rocking rage while integrating Southern rock aesthetics. This is the latest single to be lifted from the Friday, June 3 release of “Kodak,” the band’s first full-length offering since 2018’s “No Bouquet.” As much as you can try, you can never fully run away from who you are because it’ll always be part of who you are. It’s in your soul, your heart, your essence. That sense of resigned futility is something that All Get Out has captured on its touching new album, “Kodak.” Formed in Charleston, SC in 2007, frontman Nathan Hussey is the only original member left in the band, joined by guitarist Kyle Samuel, drummer Dominic Nastasi and bassist James Gibson. And while Hussey and Nastasi really fleshed out the demos between them before recording the bulk of the songs in May 2021, a conscious decision was made this time around to also incorporate the same kind of approach Hussey had taken with the two solo albums he’s released. “We wanted to make a record where I got my voice, as the writer, heard first – and then we tacked on everything else,” Hussey says. “It means this is more of a songwritery record, and that’s on purpose.” It’s a method that suits the introspective nature of the record perfectly. “A lot of the record came out to be about growing up in small towns that don’t move,” explains Hussey. “There are these little American towns that just haven’t evolved, and that’s on purpose — the way Bubba still has a Confederate flag on his pickup truck, or how friends and members of my family have perpetuated the small-town thing of having kids at 18 and doing drugs. It’s just this cycle that keeps happening.” “This album is either who I am or where I came from or a combination of both,” says Hussey. “I’m very slow to evolve, and that’s part of the record as well. Not to get too meta, but it takes me a long time in life to get there sometimes. I don’t know if I manage to reconcile my past with my present, but it has definitely been brought to attention – and that’s what was so important about this record.”

Liz Lamere – “Sin”: A seductive and hypnotic track with vague disco beats and bass lines looping around Liz Lamere’s strange vocals. “‘Sin’ is loosely inspired by Dante’s Inferno and the search for meaning in the journey of life,” notes Lamere. “The message is one of redemption, as sin is not always evil, but rather offers a glimpse into the dark side of the human condition. For me, the song is more about not letting the judgment of others, of good and evil, hold you back from fully experiencing life.  Ultimately, I hope the listener will interpret the song and find meaning in their own way.” This is a song from her debut album, “Keep It Alive,” released via In The Red on May 20th, an album with a riveting set of songs that are charged with an irrepressible lust for life and the feel for the contagious hook. While “Keep It Alive” is Lamere’s first solo album, she started out playing drums in punk bands and collaborated with her late partner Alan Vega (Suicide) for over three decades on his solo work – beginning in 1990 and recently released lost album “Mutator” that launched the Vega Vault she curates with Jared Artaud. “Keep It Alive” was recorded in her lower Manhattan apartment during the lockdown, engineered by her and Alan’s son Dante Vega Lamere in the same space where the Suicide singer constructed his light sculptures. After Vega passed away in July 2016, Liz found it cathartic to write down thoughts and observations in notebooks. The vision behind the album is about preserving your own inner fire. “Alan always encouraged me to make my own music,” says Liz. “I’ve waited until the time was right as I’ve been dedicated to preserving Alan’s vision and building his legacy.”

John Errol – “Saturday Night”: Strong beats for eerie to heavily processed vocals and a nostalgic pop melody on keys; the dream-like tune is a vehicle for a recollection of the past to mirror the ways in which we rebuild history in our minds. This is Errol’s new single from his debut LP, “Inferno,” out via Flexible Distribution/Terrible Records. Speaking on the single, John wrote: “‘Kiss You on a Saturday Night’ reconsiders a relationship in its aftermath, reckoning with mutual queer destruction and how it could have been unhealthy or even abusive. I think abuse in queer relationships tends to get overlooked, and in this song and video, I tried to stare it right in the face. Much of this song is limited to my specific experience, and the lyrics and video speak to my story if you choose to look for it.  I wanted the production and song structure to be cyclical and nostalgic to mimic the regret, memory, longing, and rebuilding of the past taking place on a narrative level. Channeling darker subject matter in a sweet and simple pop vehicle allows for some interesting juxtaposition, a way to capture the slow & insidious nature of abuse. The video [directed by Nora DeLigter] is a sensitive subject matter, and I’m having difficulty explaining myself without oversharing. So much of it deals with memory and trauma, where the past and present collapse onto each other. The directors and I also wanted to pay tribute to the skyline of Los Angeles. It’s hard to find love here, and it’s just as easy to get consumed by the city itself. Ultimately, though, it was a way for me to process and portray our dance—to take the pain and fashion it into something beautiful.”

Sarah Kinsley – “What Was Mine”: A lush melody with classical orchestral arrangements and Sarah Kinsley’s deep acrobatics vocals for an emotional tune filled with rewarding hooks and detours. “Cypress,” the new EP from the rising New York-based singer-songwriter is set for release on June 10 via Everybody’s Music. The new music follows the release of her acclaimed 2021 EP, “The King.” The accompanying video for “What Was Mine” was directed by fellow Columbia University student and frequent creative-collaborator Lux, the video features Kinsley and her friends performing a self-choreographed dance routine. Produced by Kinsley with additional mixing from Jake Aron, “Cypress” showcases the songstress’ lofty range as an artist as it veers from one shade to another and one cascading melody into the next. The new music showcases Kinsley’s versatility as an artist as she wrote, performed, and produced the entirety of the EP.  Of the project, Kinsley recalls: “When my family and I traveled to California, nearly a month after the release of The King, I felt the strongest connection—physical, emotional, spiritual—to a place than any I had ever known before. I had spent most of my life between my small hometown in Connecticut and the vastly different island of Singapore. Driving through California, I didn’t feel at home necessarily, but I felt free. I grew attached to cypress trees, searching for them along the freeways, trying to decipher their meanings, and why I could not distract myself away from their mystique.” “I stared at the trees, searching through the slivers of light, the cracks of what might be, the life that might contain itself within the green. And this is where the EP began. Understanding that my own shying away from the dual ideas of who I was, the inability to pick up the pen, all of this was some form of hiding, protecting, saving. Perhaps a part of me felt that I might lose all of myself, if not for the cypress, if not for the thing that might save me. Can we make art and still save a part of ourselves?”

 

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