Skip to content

Buying Tickets In New York Is A Rigged Game? Wow, Thanks Attorney General, What A Shocker

AG

In what must be the stupidest expose ever, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has announced that about 50% of tickets to locl events never reaches the public. No? Really? What is he going to tell us next?

Anybody who ever plays the ticket game in New York City knows its rigged, how can 150,000 tickets instantaneously sell out? How else, more like.  But how about these numbers: “The report cited a single broker buying 1,012 tickets within one minute to a U-2 concert at Madison Square Garden when they went on sale on Dec. 8, 2014, despite the vendor’s claim of a four-ticket limit. By day’s end, that broker and one other had 15,000 tickets to U2’s North American shows.”

Also,

“Venues and sellers like Ticketmaster regularly tacked on fees that added more than 21 percent to the face value, investigators said. They found that on average, 16 percent of tickets are reserved for various industry insiders like the venue employees, artists and promoters, while 38 percent are reserved for presales to certain groups like holders of a particular credit card.”

It is interesting to see the complete indifference of the artist to this gargantuan rip off, mostly because they are in on it as well.

 

Here is Associated Press’ Michael Vertanen, to break it down.

 

Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in a report released Thursday that his investigation of the industry was prompted by consumer complaints, which his office receives regularly.

“Ticketing, to put it bluntly, is a fixed game,” the report said. Investigators found abuses and practices that prevent consumers from buying tickets at affordable prices or sometimes even getting them at all.

Investigators found that third-party brokers resell tickets on sites like StubHub and TicketsNow at average margins of 49 percent above face-value and sometimes more than 10 times the price. Some brokers use illegal specialty software, called “ticket bots,” to quickly purchase as many desirable tickets as possible for resale at significant markups, they said.

The report cited a single broker buying 1,012 tickets within one minute to a U-2 concert at Madison Square Garden when they went on sale on Dec. 8, 2014, despite the vendor’s claim of a four-ticket limit. By day’s end, that broker and one other had 15,000 tickets to U2’s North American shows.

A call to Madison Square Garden was not immediately returned Thursday.

Venues and sellers like Ticketmaster regularly tacked on fees that added more than 21 percent to the face value, investigators said. They found that on average, 16 percent of tickets are reserved for various industry insiders like the venue employees, artists and promoters, while 38 percent are reserved for presales to certain groups like holders of a particular credit card.

Ticketmaster did not immediately reply to a request for comment.

The report also criticized “price floors,” particularly by sports leagues and teams including the NFL and New York Yankees, which are rules meant to prevent tickets from being sold below their face value and that deprive the public of possibly cheaper tickets. Many NFL teams encourage or even require ticket holders to use Ticketmaster’s NFL Ticket Exchange platform, where the seller is prohibited from cutting the price.

“The more aggressively sports leagues and individual teams push ticket buyers and sellers to use their ‘official’ secondary markets, the more serious this problem becomes,” the report said.

“This investigation is just the beginning of our efforts to create a level playing field in the ticket industry,” Schneiderman said.

The attorney general also has reached settlements with two ticket brokers operating without a reseller license. The settlements require one company to pay $80,000 and the other $65,000. They and their principals also must maintain a license.

The attorney general’s office issued a report more than 15 years ago that found New York’s ticket distribution system was largely underground and provided “access to quality seating on the basis of bribes and corruption at the expense of fans.”

Thursday’s report said that despite changes in technology and state law, the problems persist, and event ticketing is the great exception to areas of the economy where online sales have yielded lower prices and greater transparency.

Leave a Comment





Amazon_Smile_logo
LET-ME-HELP-LOGO

Support Let Me Help Inc by shopping at smile.amazon.com

Sneak Peaks: Upcoming Recorded release 2-10-23 -2-16-23

By Iman Lababedi | February 6, 2023 |

it has been four years since her last long player

How to Get Your Music Noticed

By Emma Hil | February 5, 2023 |

quickly get your music noticed

Press Releases For February: Here Are The Artists

By Alyson Camus | February 5, 2023 |

A fast rock & roll song performed with a retro punk vibe

Creem – America’s Only Rock ‘n’ Roll Magazine, Reviewed Issue By Issue – April 1983 (Volume 14, Number 11)

By Steve Crawford | February 5, 2023 |

the final issue edited by Susan Whitall

Best Albums Of 2023 Alphabetically By Artist Ending January 31st

By Iman Lababedi | February 5, 2023 |

hard rock meets classic rock meets Americana

L.A. Burning: West Coast Concert Picks February 6th To 12th

By Alyson Camus | February 4, 2023 |

Chuck D is at the Grammy Museum

On The Red Carpet For The Screening Of “The Beast Inside” At The Angelica Cinema, Sunday, January 29th, 2023: pictures by Billy Hess

By admin | February 4, 2023 |

a powerhouse performance by Sadie Katz and SohoJohnny as you never thought you’d see him

UK Top 10 Albums 2-3-23 – 2-9-23

By Iman Lababedi | February 4, 2023 |

that SNL gig was excellent

UK Top 10 Singles 2-3-23 – 2-9-23

By Iman Lababedi | February 4, 2023 |

Miley rises to top of the celebrity food chain

The Early Bird: New Recorded Releases 2-3-22 – 2-9-22 Reviewed

By Iman Lababedi | February 3, 2023 |

captivating, hooklined, country pop songs

Scroll To Top